Monday, 9 February 2015

Sulphur on grapes. Knowledge from my grandfather.




A picture from the family album; my grandfather’s grape conservatory.

In early 1900 my grandfather was a professional grape grower. So he had many grape conservatories. In those days, to battle the fungicide in the grape gardens, sulphur was used. Today my younger brother still has - In a torn, brown paper bag - a remnant of sulphur from that time.

Each year I ask my brother a little bit of the sulphur from that bag to treat my two grapes with. Last year however, we used the last remains of that old sulphur. So, what to do this year? My brother found the solution. He bought a new bucket of sulphur and gave it to me as a birthday present. I was over the moon!

The knowledge how to use the sulphur goes from father to son (or, in this case daughter). I learnt the trick of the trade from my father too.

"Make a paste of equal parts of sulphur and yogurt. It may also be custard, just look what's in the fridge." My father was a practical man!
"Stir briskly so that it becomes an even paste. This paste is than brushed thickly on the grape buds. Do this every spring before the buds start to grow."

Last week I have smeared the grapes again according to the old "family recipe". After the treatment, the grapes looked rather curious. Every year I have to explain visitors why they look that way. While I am explaining this, my mind wanders off to the grape garden of my grandfather.

The knowledge from my grandfather has not been forgotten and I still cherish it!



Foto Hans van Arnhem

Sulphur is a natural product. Here two pictures of a volcano that my sister and her husband visited.
Foto Hans van Arnhem
 Sulphur from a volcano, somewhere in Indonesia...



Let's start. Sulphur, yoghurt and a jar


Smear the past thickly on the grape buds.


Do it every spring.


After the treatment, the grapes looked rather curious. 


Summer. The grape in the back garden looks rather healthy after the sulphur treatment!


All new followers a warm welcome!

3 comments:

  1. Lovely post and very informative. Many thanks!

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  2. Dear Hetty
    So interesting! Love the story about your grandfather and the knowledge he gave to you...
    Fantastic. Hetty!

    Hugs
    JetteMajken

    ReplyDelete
  3. Love the old family photo! And, that's quite an interesting structure - I've neve seen grapes grown that way. Here, my father-in-law still uses sulphur on the fruit trees, although not on our grapes. I wonder why?

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